Howard Stern Show No Longer Compels Me To Listen

Howard Stern

The End For Me Has Arrived

I am a lifelong diehard Howard Stern fanatic and I am no longer compelled to tune into his show. Howard has earned my eternal gratitude for a 20+ year run of unparalleled entertainment, but that run has definitively ended for me.

Some changes in my consumption of entertainment coupled with some disappointing moments in the evolution of Howard's show have both lent to my current disinterest.

I am formally declaring the end of my listenership while also extending a heartfelt thanks to Howard and his staff. They colored my mornings in a manner that can never be replicated by any other personality or entertainment crew again.  

Photo credited to  Bill Norton  and used under  CC License  with no changes made to the image

Photo credited to Bill Norton and used under CC License with no changes made to the image

My Indoctrination To The Stern Show

My fanaticism started back around 1989 - 1990 at the start of my high school years. Each morning I would catch about 20 minutes of the show in the car driving to school with my buddy.

Saturday nights I got to tune into the glory that was Howard's now infamous Channel 9 show. I even went into downtown Philadelphia to attend Stern's live Funeral Event broadcast for John DeBella, a local Morning Zoo radio host whom Stern had fully eviscerated through an on air feud.

When I attended college it proved to be the perfect time to deepen my love of all things Howard Stern and I spent entire mornings listening to the show. During those years I also devoured both of his books, his Private Parts movie and every single episode of the E Entertainment show.     

The Stern show was comprised of peripheral, yet integral characters that swirled around Howard's studio of madness. Howard himself railed against anything and anyone. He conducted his broadcast like the maestro of a symphony, orchestrating the sweet sounds of chaos that ensued on a daily basis. It commanded that I tune in.

The Two Golden Eras Of The Stern Show

I feel there were two golden eras of the Howard Stern Show. The first took place when his staff was comprised of Jackie “The Joke Man” Martling, Billy West, Stuttering John and KC Armstrong.

They were in addition to current and long term mainstays like Fred Norris, Gary “Baba Booey” Dell’Abate and Robin Quivers.

Whether it was the Gary Puppet, the I See OJ Call, KC song parodies or one of the many fabled inner staff fights, the show was producing a prolific amount of reality based content that induced gut level laughs.

Photo credited to  Ciron810  under  CC License  with no modification to the image

Photo credited to Ciron810 under CC License with no modification to the image

The next phase of the show that I consider the second of two golden eras was around 2005 when out from Stern's staff was Stuttering John, Jackie, KC Armstrong and Billy West and now in was Artie Lange, Sal “The Stockbroker” Governale and Richard Christy.

Artie's full time presence in the studio provided a stand up's quick wit. He had the ability to punch up a moment with a brilliantly timed one liner, while also introducing his long form storytelling.

Artie's artful and soul bearing tales of gambling, snorting coke through a prosthetic pig nose or of his relationship with his father were all captivating. He could stir up riotous laughter and at times had me burgeoning on tears.

Sal and Richard were the new muses that allowed Howard to double down on the more sophomoric elements of the show. It was this exact time as well that Stern was transitioning from terrestrial radio to the new and unchartered territory of Sirius satellite radio.

It was the perfect storm of a reinvigorated staff combined with the unshackling from the chains of the always looming FCC. It created what I feel is the greatest 5 year stretch of Stern Show history.  

The First Sign Of Trouble For My Listenership

It wasn't clear to me right away, but Artie Lange's departure from the show was the line of demarcation between me being a wholehearted fanatic and my eventual tuning out entirely.

Some of the most hilarious and gripping content produced on the Stern show centered around Lange. Over time though Artie's weight ballooned, beyond fraternal kidding, and signs of his drug addiction were often on display.

When the news broke that Artie had fell victim to an attempted suicide I was shocked and saddened. Howard spent some time on air directly addressing the tragic situation and wishing Artie the best, but ultimately circled the wagons. He made it clear that the show was moving forward without Artie, leaving no room for interpretation of a potential return in the future.

At first, the show seemed to gain an emotional lift by separating from the madness that is dealing with an addict. While some darkness had been expunged with Artie's exit, gone too were Artie's masterful ways of weaving tales and his skillful knack of slipping verbal jabs into someone else's dialogue.

Artie's departure from the studio was a critical blow to the show. It truly stood out to me about a year or so later when replays during the show's vacation breaks featured Artie at his best. It blew me away just how integrated Artie's presence had been worked into the heart and soul of the show.

It reminded me that a large part of Howard's brilliance, in addition to his preeminent interviewing skills, was orchestrating the staff around him. And now, the largest looming side character in Stern show history was no longer there.  

Howard Goes Commercial?

The next key moment in the evolution of Howard's show struck an immediate negative chord with me and that was Howard's decision to become a judge on the network television show America's Got Talent.

My initial concern was fear of a potential sellout from the man who made his bones giving the middle finger to the establishment. I feel this concern did eventually play out through some format and culture changes, but those changes took years to develop.

Photo credit to  Jim Larrison  under  CC License . Image cropped for sizing.

Photo credit to Jim Larrison under CC License. Image cropped for sizing.

My secondary concern to his AGT announcement was the prospects of having to be subjected to constant promotion of AGT during Howard's radio broadcast. That concern was realized from day one.

Deep down I did not begrudge Howard's desire to take this opportunity, but that does not mean as a loyal radio listener I wanted the show to become dominated by it. In the past Howard could get fixated on topics like the FCC, which could become incessant subjects of prolonged rants from Howard, but unlike AGT, I felt vested in Howard's battles with the FCC. No part of me had interest in AGT. It was lost on me and the considerable uptick in discussion surrounding it was tiring.

Some of the format and culture changes to the show have been subtle and possibly not detectable to a casual listener. The never mentioned, but purported banishing of longtime Stern show standout guest Gilbert Gottfried seems to lend credence to murmurs that the show is overtly distancing itself from people and or subjects deemed potentially too troubling for the modern day broadcast.

There was multiple reports that Howard had made an executive level hire of a woman whose sole focus was to clean up Howard's image and to continue to build upon the mainstream appeal Howard had established through his work on AGT.

Howard built his career waging war against industry executives and if this report were true it feels like a move that is the antithesis to the way Stern constructed his empire. It appears Howard is now positioning his show to be a safe stop in the Hollywood promotional rotation just like late night TV.

I do not begrudge Howard for wanting opportunities to interview the elite of entertainment and sports, but the progression to an A-list celebrity driven format just bores me.  

Podcasts To Listen To

Beyond the evolution of the show itself, I feel there is another factor at play to the waning of my Stern Show listenership and that is the explosion of podcasts over the past few years. From true crime, to history, to self-empowerment titans like Tim Ferriss, there are countless shows to fulfill a variety of needs for staying entertained and informed.

At the forefront to me is Joe Rogan with his Joe Rogan Experience Podcast. Joe made his name as a comedian and television entertainer, but has a wide array of personal interests and business ventures. There is a wealth of ideas and philosophies put forth on his podcast to help spark and or shape the pursuit of a better life.

There is also in depth discussion on the current state of society as a whole. This platform Rogan built serves as an aggregator of personalities, provoking thoughts and expanding debate away from the confines of the mainstream. It is an entertainment format I am being drawn to more consistently these days.

The Joe Rogan Experience Podcast logo. Still Feel 21 has no relationship with The Joe Rogan Experience Podcast.

The Joe Rogan Experience Podcast logo. Still Feel 21 has no relationship with The Joe Rogan Experience Podcast.

Howard Stern Comes Again

Howard surged back into the consciousness of mainstream America with the recent release of his third book titled Howard Stern Comes Again

I have not personally read the book, but per my beloved wife who refuses to relinquish her fandom of Howard, it is a greatest hits format of his more prominent and interesting interviews he has given through the course of his illustrious and one of a kind career. 

Of particular note in Howard Stern Comes Again is the content surrounding Donald Trump. Trump spent a great deal of time on Howard back in the day so to see some of the things he was saying back then, knowing he is now our president, can be quite fascinating or horrifying, depending on your perspective.

When It's Over, It's Over

When any serious long-term relationship ends that spent the majority of its years in blissful joy it is typically never the fault of one individual or the end result of a specific situation. It more often tends to be an accumulation of messiness and a compounding of miscommunication that drives the two parties off in distinct parting paths.

For my part, I take full ownership of the fact that I have grown and changed in the past 20 years, but I also no longer recognize the Stern show I fell so deeply in love with.

No matter what though, Howard forever has my love and ultimate respect. He took my uneventful and sleepy morning hours and injected them with maniacal joy. He did so on a daily basis for 20+ years. 

I don't think there will ever be a radio show, comedian or entertainment personality that can ever deliver that sort of prolific comedic output for me again.

I am forever grateful, but I am also now off the ride. I almost ended this piece with the signature "bye for now", quoting the departed Stern show wack packer Eric the Actor, but I think it is more appropriate to simply say bye.

Please Comment

Are you still a diehard Howard Stern listener? What am I currently missing out on? Are you like me, and no longer compelled to tune in to the Stern Show? When did you fall out with the show? Please comment. We would love to hear from you.